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military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
>>> on the broadcast tonight, closing in on gadhafi. there's talk of u.s. military options against him. and now for hordes of people, now's the time to get out of there. >>> a collision course in wisconsin with time running out. tonight, is there a deal to end the standoff? >>> america at the crossroads. all week long our reports here on america's changing economy. tonight, are we keeping up in the search for the next big thing? >>> and the winner is -- the good, the bad and the ugly at this year's oscars. and the amazing story behind the man behind the best picture. and the amazing story behind the man behind the best picture. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the situation in libya is now a lot more serious where the u.s. is concerned. u.s. navy ships are being readied for a number of possible options here including possibly enforcing a no-fly zone. moammar gadhafi spoke again today on two television networks an interview the u.s. immediately called delusional. all this time the forces against him are closing in. we begin t
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
, if you are just waking up. fresh word from the nation's top military officer after u.s. and coalition forces bombarded libya's defenses overnight. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news there is a no-fly zone in place in libya. that's after more than 110 tomahawk cruise missiles from warships and submarines slammed the antiaircraft units and command posts. admiral mullen also said that possible outcome of the military action could include the embattled leader, moammar gadhafi, remaining in power. meanwhile, gadhafi issued an audio address on state tv, saying the country was preparing for a long war. on the screen, the image of a giant, gold fist crushing an american plane. nbc's jim maceda's in libya's capital of tripoli. jim, with another good day to you, we have cruise missiles that were targeting sites around the city there. what's it like there now? >> reporter: here, it's quiet. it wasn't so at 2:30, 3:00 in the morning, though, alex. we all jumped and jolted first when we heard a number of explosions. it was these deep thuds that you never like to hear. they could have been cruise m
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
in the euro after it jumped to a four-month high against the u.s. dollar on thursday. now coming away from that a little bit, but obviously underlying that, underpinning the euro was the central bank president. slightly caught investors offguard when he said interest rates may rise as soon as next month. people had been betting in terms of june or may. the yen at 82.44 to the dollar. >>> investors across asia seem to be focusing pretty much what's going on in the u.s. we've got that better than expected jobs number out. it was a weekly jobs number which is providing a pretty strong indicator, at least that's how it's being seen for the u.s. economy. that rally overnight. and that helped the markets pretty much across the board here in asia. all four of the key markets up by more than 1.4%. there was a weaker yen against the u.s. dollar in japan, that helped the exporters. all in all, hong kong up 1.25%, shanghai 1.3%, and australia with a 1.2% gain. >>> well, if you thought that was impressive, let's have a look at the u.s. markets. and essentially what we're looking at is the best session
pushing back against mounting pressure to impose a military no-fly zone over libya. why one u.s. official says it's, quote, an extraordinary complex situation. plus, gas prices soaring as the crisis in libya intensifies. is it time now for the united states to tap into its emergency oil reserve to soften the blow at the pump? and an estimated 18,000 refugees crowded into a tent city near the libyan border as a full-blown humanitarian crisis is unfolding. lots happening right here today in "the situation room." pendingo much money on printing. i'd like to put you in charge of cutting costs. calm down. i know that it is not your job. what i'm saying... excuse me? alright, fine. no, you don't have to do it. ok? [ male announcer ] notre dame knows it's better for xerox to control its printing costs. so they can focus on winning on and off the field. [ manager ] are you sure i can't talk -- ok, no, i get it. [ male announcer ] with xerox, you're ready for real business. and go everywhere. to help revitalize a neighborhood in massachusetts, restore a historic landmark in harlem, fund a local bu
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
. police are searching for possible accomplices. >>> in business news the federal reserve says the u.s. economy continues toex pand gradually while some manufacturers and retailers are starting to pass on higher crude oil prices to customers. >>> on wednesday the fed released the so-called beige book report. that's a survey of economic conditions in the 12 districts across the country. the document says overall economic activity continued to expand at a modest to moderate pace in january and early february. it says most districts reported continued rises in corporate production and con sumtder spending. meanwhile, the report notes that manufacturers and retailers have passed on higher costs of crude oil and raw materials to clients and or are planning to do so in the near future. this trend will likely continue if commodity prices keep rising. >>> now, apple chief executive steve jobs returned from medical leave for a day to unveil a new lighter ipad tablet computer equipped with two cameras. >> thanks for coming. thank you. it's really thin. and it comes in two colors. >> jobs made hi
republican candidate mike huckabee is confused about where the current president grew up. but first, the u.s. is closer to the crisis in libya. tonight two u.s. warships are heading for the waters off libya although for now he says it's not to fight. >> we'll be enter the mediterranean shortly. it will provide us a capability for both emergency evacuations. >> moammar gadhafi is trying as hard as he can to hold onto power. pro-gadhafi troops tried and failed to retake a town neurotripoli currently under rebel control. and one of gadhafi's sons tells cnn the government is trying to talk with the rebels, but the rebel leadership is in chaos. let's start with cnn's international correspondent, ben wedeman, who is in rebel-held city benghazi. the former libyan interior minister says the noose is tightening around gadhafi's neck. tell us where have you gone and what have you seen? >> we headed sort of in the direction of tripoli. what we've seen is that the noose isn't necessarily tightening around gadhafi's neck. it's clear the opposition is in firm control of this part of the country, but if yo
the next day and then you're not putting up any forces, you're criticizing the u.s. for foreign military intervention. so they want to make sure the arabs are along with them so then they can't be blamed later on. so that's -- >> finish your point there. >> so that's why we've been seeing secretary clinton really in the last week reaching out to those arab leaders saying, we need you with us. you say you're going to -- you say you support this, you say you want us to influence the no-fly zone, what are you going to do to stand with us to do this? this is really extraordinary. an arab league authorizing force against one of its members. as we've said, it's really a unique since the gulf war in 1991. >> unique in many ways, but no matter what, will there still be some elements in the arab world who will see this as still being operated, still being controlled behind the scenes at least in large part by western powers, appearing once again to be exerting some kind of military action in another arab country? >> well, we've seen -- that's why this is really unique. because nobody has
gadhafi. we spoke to people on the streets there. they're thankful to countries likes the u.s. and france. they believe this will eventually lead to a free libya. there's a period of insurgency. this is the scary part because of how illogical gadhafi is and because of what he called his thirst for blood. >> alex, thanks. let's go to the capital of tripoli again. allen little, of the bbc is there. he joins us live. you heard the mood in benghazi. what do you think the next move is in tripoli? how are they portraying it there? >> reporter: well, finding colonel gadhafi. it's not hard to find people around the city here echoing the sentiments. people saying they're willing to die along with the colonel if it comes to that. there's though doubting the sincerity. their devotion gets more intense. the more isolated he becomes from the world. how represent sif that voice? no other voice can make itself heard here in the prevailing atmosphere in which patriotism is fused can devotion for the person of gadhafi himself. what of the people that don't take part in the demonstrations? what do they fee
are considering other ways to help those suffering in libya. hillary clinton says the u.s. military might have a role to play, such as getting supplies to where they're needed. the u.s. secretary of state acknowledged direct intervention would face major opposition. the arab league says it's against any foreign interference. >>> now, some people taking part in the uprising against colonel gadhafi say they want western forces to give support, to prevent more attacks by government planes. some politicians in washington say the u.s. should do just that. but the defense secretary told congress it wouldn't be easy. >> if it's ordered, we can do it. but the really is, and people, there's a lot of, frankly, loose talk about some of these military options. and let's just call a spade a spade. a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. to destroy the air defenses. that's the way you'd do a no-fly zone. and then you can fly planes around the country and not worry about our guys being shot down. but that's the way it starts. >> i'm not endorsing it. >> no, i understand that. but it also requires more
>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
range of companies. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> president obama says the u.s. and nato are still considering their options for lydia, including military intervention. >> i want to send a clear message to those around colonel gaddafi. it is their choice to make how they will be held accountable. >> gaddafi's troops to retake territory after a day of sustained attacks. >> [inaudible] çquite a success for colonel gaddafi's army. >> the un says 200,000 people have fled the violence in libya. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. washington reintroduce this military trials at guantanamo bay despite anç earlier promise to close it down. the party is over for the highest-paid actor on american television. charlie sheen is sacked from his, a program. ç>> the six gulf states includg saudi arabia have called on the un security council to implement a no-fly zone over libya. the un needed to protect libyan citizens. earlier president obama said the u.s. and allies are stillç considering a military response to the situation
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
>>> u.s. fire power. allied military muscle. speeding towards libya to stop a brutal civil war. >> we cannot stand idly by when a tyrant tells his people that there will be no mercy. >> translator: he's totally defied the warning. >> moammar gadhafi isn't backing down. >> translator: now all detos will be open and armed people to defend people and its unity. >> a showdown of force on many sides with global impact. >> we'd like to welcome our viewers around the globe watching special coverage. i'm don lemon. >> i'm john vause. the time for warnings is over. the time for action is now. as the u.s. joins a coalition of countries targeting moammar gadhafi's forces. heavy gun fire and explosion in libya's capital of tripoli hours after the coalition attacked the defenses. in theatest move british jets flew 3,000 miles to carry out a missile strike on key targets. >> john, earlier the pentagon said u.s. and british ships and submarines fired more than 110 tomahawk missiles. they hit about 20 libyan air and missile defense targets. coalition calling this "operation odyssey dawn." >> f
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
spread through the arab world, the voices of some very divided israelis and palestinians. plus, in the u.s. when catholic and noncatholic hospitals merge catholic bishops can make decisions about women's health and some doctors object. >> we can make that decision, but then it has to be okayed by someone else who puts their belief systems and their ethics on me and on my patients, which i just don't think is right. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. tensions are rising in israel, gaza and the west bank after this week's escalation of violence. faith-based groups are among those condemning wednesday's deadly bombing at a bus stop in jerusalem, the first major attack in jerusalem in four years. one person died and more than two dozen others were wounded. several u.s. jewish groups expressed their outrage. the group churches for middle east peace also denounced the violence and called on the international community to take more action to restart the peace process. in libya, fighting continued between gadhafi loyalists and the rebels, despite the international milit
for the u.s. relief effort underway. this is the 3rd marine brigade leaving the marine core station in okinawa, headed to coordinate with the rest of the u.s. forces. and here is the coordination taking place and helicopters from the u.s.s. ronald reagan have done 20 missions to and from japanese ships and food and supplies to three different towns and that's a lot the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived yesterday and will continue to help out with search and rescue in the area for the days to come. back to you guys. >> alisyn: peter doocy, thank you so much. even for the people who survived this horrible event, the tsunami, they're far from out of the woods. there are roeports that 1.4 million households have been without water since the quake struck and 2 1/2 million households are without lek trysts. >> clayton: the numbers keep going up. earlier in the show, 200,000 people evacuated according to nhk, the public broadcasting company there in japan. 380,000 people have been evacuated to emergency, emergency shelters and many of those shelters, alisyn, as you were pointing out. don't have
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
that it will be brief. he will be speaking from the u.s. army right here in the nation's cap tell and speaking to a country that has mixed feelings about the third military intervention in the past decade and not to convince that this mission has a clear goal or exit strategy. the commander in chief will be speaking about how long and decision to intervening here and the united states and violence against demonstrators in bahrain, syria, another hot spot in the middle east. wolf blitzer will rejoin us before and after the president's big address, including anderson cooper as well as reports from inside experience team and great experience team of analysts. let's begin on the ground in libya. we'll check out the map. one clear result if you take a close look at the air strikes and remove here, i want to go back to march 18th. the day before the strikes began, the day before, you can see right here in red, these were towns just before, just before the strikes began. controlled red meaning controlled by the regime. look where we are today. controlled green. that is controlled by the opposition. t
the american people tonight to explain the u.s. mission in libya. the reasoning behind it. the u.s. military's role, and are we go from here. all this comes on the heels of a significant, rather, a dramatic victory for the administration with nato agreeing yesterday to take command of the mission including the ground attack. that as international airstrikes continue for the 9th night over the nation. libya state tv broadcast these images from a southern city of sabha claiming the attacks were against civilians. top nato commander today hitting back against suggestions that nato forces are essentially providing air cover for the rebels. >> our goal, our goal, it is to help protect civilians and population centers from attack or that are the threat of an attack. >>shepard: the in six not to take sides but we have. the opposition is benefiting, before the no-fly zone they were in trouble but this has weakened the military. and now the two sides are fighting on equal terms because of us and they are closing in on muammar qaddafi's hometown, a key government stronghold on the road to tripoli. and
leading the air assault on libyan air defense and assets on the ground, the u.s. will pull back and hand over command and control to someone. when? >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and not a matter of weeks. >> reporter: the u.s. role will then shift to providing logistical support while the uk, france, italy and other countries enforce the no-fly zone. but no one will say how long that will last. >> i wouldn't speculate in terms of length at this particular point in time. >> reporter: after all, the no-fly zone over iraq ended from the end of gulf war i to the beginning of gulf war ii, 11 years. >>> there is now growing international disagreement over the u.s.-led attacks. norway with drew its planes because it was unsure about which country was in charge. meanwhile, russian prime minister vladimir putin railed against the air strikes as outside meddling, saying it is, quote, reminiscent of a medieval call for a crusade when someone called on others to go and liberate something. >>> and be sure to stay with abc news all day as we continue our c
of the day. u.s. forces will nuteralize the aircraft of the libyans and other people are not going to commit to the ground and i fear al-gaddafi's forces are going to prevail over the long term unless we find a better way to support the resistance on the ground. >> neil: cornel. we are watching the opening statement. that is watch because i don't understand portuguese. i apologize . the other bad news, is no one understands portuguese. >> neil: i -- know. this is the longest opening statement on the part of a foreign leader in the history of man. but the president is down there and we are told hillary clinton secretary of state did brief him on these talks going on with the french president nicholas sarkozy and many are saying that hillary clinton are sounding the clarion call and leading that in the administration, what do you think of that? >> it is apparent france is taking the leading role. they demonstrated they are committed to doing something and we hope that our european alleys and alleys in the africa will end up being the ones and our egyptian friends and the ones who are providing
. radiation levels prompting the u.s. military to consider mandatory evacuation of thousands of american troops and their families in japan. radioactive dust being detected at very low levels, we want to point out in seattle, washington. despite substantial progress over the weekend this is far from over. we're going to have the latest details at this hour, also the latest on the dead and missing now numbering 21,000. and the body of a young american teacher has been found. we talked about her on this show last week, her parents had been searching for her. she's the first known american fatality. we begin though with the attack on gadhafi forces in libya, now entering day four. allied forces launching as many as 80 missions today, that is up from yesterday. americans flying fewer than half of them, that is down from yesterday. according to mission commander, pro-gadhafi forces are mounting little resistance, nor is the opposition taking advantage of air strikes on pro-gadhafi missions. while grateful for the air support, they're having trouble getting organized and have little communicat
, however, as you noted, because even amid this crisis, the u.s. has had some contact with libyan officials and that has been critical in terms of helping to get americans and others out of the tripoli safely. so if you were to cut off all of those ties, that could put some of the remaining americans, obviously, in some jeopardy. why would the u.s. then take such a dramatic step and cut off all diplomatic ties? because that was a big deal for colonel gadhafi a few years ago when the george w. bush administration finally said he was no longer a rogue state, that they would recognize him diplomatally because he came forward with his weapons program. if all of a sudden the u.s. cut off all ties, that would he remove even more if there is a shred of legitimacy left for gadhafi and remove it once and for all. that would be the pressure point because that is something he has craved so long is have some legitimacy on the world stage. of course, given what ben is reporting and given what is happening on the ground right now, it's doubtful he has any legitimacy but the u.s. is looking for any lever
and nato enter libya. >> woodruff: plus we look at military options for the u.s. and others, including establishing a no-fly zone over the north african nation. >> warner: marcia coyle gives us the latest from the supreme court, including today's 8-1 ruling upholding the free speech rights of protesters at military funerals. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the controversy surrounding dozens of no fishing zones off the coast of california. >> california is establishing dozens of protected areas in the ocean, but the problem is there aren't enough game wardens to enforce the rules. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks to libyan-born u.s. poet khaled mattawa about life in libya under qaddafi and today's uprising. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institu
tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen. >> -- sent over to support them in their efforts has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people, which were added to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've actually taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions, mounted them, one on a fixed wing aircraft, one on a helicopter. and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we have been collecting information as they've come back when t
, and other u.s. officials and more pressure today from john mccain about what the military options might be. mccain now joining john kerry and others, calling for a no-fly zone and pushback from the pentagon, despite denials, i know, that the pentagon spokesman was on your show earlier at 9:00, saying that there has been no pushback. but certainly, what we've seen from secretary gates and the chairman of the joint chiefs, admiral mullen, is emphasizing all of the drawbacks to getting involved militarily there. chuck? >> well, you laid it out very well there, andrea. secretary gates yesterday, in referring to the no-fly -- the talk about the no-fly zone as loose talk certainly created the impression that there was somehow a little bit of a disconnect between the state department and the pentagon, about what is next, how serious is this idea for a no-fly done. so clearly, that's one of the questions that's going to be directed at the president later today. now, let's be careful, by the way, not to call this a press conference. they are only saying one question, for, quote, each side. >> one!
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